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Testing Tips

Develop a Plan of Action


Figure out what needs to be accomplished
Set a realistic goal for each class
Set up a schedule for the next two weeks
Utilize your prime times
Plan breaks


Use Good Study Techniques


Divide your time into small blacks (1-2 hours)
Focus on one subject at a time
Keep an idea sheet for random thoughts that pop into your head
Use 3x5 cards for memorization
Review, Review, Review some more!
Take breaks and reward yourself


Use Your Resources


Study with classmates for support and to enhance learning
Be willing to ask for help
Take practice tests


Practice Stress Management Techniques


Get sufficient rest and eat properly to avoid stress build up
Exercise to burn off stress
Practice physical and mental relaxation
Use your planned breaks


Develop a Positive Attitude


Believe in your ability
Don't compare yourself to others
Don't focus on past mistakes
Do the very best work that you can
Strive to be realistic in your thinking - one test is not your whole life!


Arrive On Time


If you are early, do not talk about the test with other students. They may have studied in a manner that is different than your style. Also, the concerns of others tend to increase any worries you may have.
If you arrive late, you may miss important verbal instructions. Arriving late can also make you feel rushed and tense. If you do come late, take a minute to relax and collect yourself. Ask your instructor if there are any instructions that you may have missed.


Bring All Materials Needed For The Test

Blue book
#2 Pencil
Calculator
...


Write Down Formulas or Processes as Soon as You Get Your Test Paper


This clears your mind for thinking rather than simply storing information. It also eases the stress of concerns that you will forget them.


Preview The Test


Note the total number of problems and kinds of questions asked.
How many points are each type of problem worth?
Based on this information, how much time should you spend on each question?
Spend the most time on the questions that receive the most credit.


Read All Directions Slowly and Carefully


Professors tell us that one of the primary reasons that students lose points on tests is that they make CARELESS mistakes. After all that studying, why lose points by misreading the question?
Many instructors refuse to give credit to right answers that are not correctly marked, so read the instructions with care.


Underline Key Terms and Steps in the Directions and in Each Question.


Answer the Easiest Questions First


This builds your confidence. It also triggers memory for the other information.
If you run out of time, you will have answered the questions that you knew.


Expect Memory Blocks


No need to panic when you run into a question you should know, but forgot. Mark it, and then go on. Return to these questions when time permits, if only to guess.


Attempt Every Question


Make Your Responses Neat and Legible


Unless you are using a special form that will be scanned for scoring, cross out incorrect information instead of taking time to erase.


Work at Your Own Pace


Don't worry about the people leaving before you.


Review the Questions and Your Answers


Should you change an answer that you are unsure of? Our suggestion is that you look at old exams. Count the number of questions that you changed, and those that were changed in error. You may find that you do just fine when you change an answer, but you may find that your first response is often the best.


 

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